Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Eamon Javers
CNBC Reporter
KQED 08/31/2013
Javers: Thanks to this leak from Edward Snowden, "the Washington Post" was able to break a blockbuster story and detailed for the first time what exactly is in the $52.6 billion budget for the intelligence community, including more than 21,000 employees at the CIA. It’s the first time we've seen this level of detail for all of the 16 different components of the intelligence community itself.
Eamon Javers
CNBC Reporter
KQED 08/31/2013
Javers; Seeing amazing resurgence of the CIA in this era of drone warfare and clandestine warfare around the world, the CIA reporting a 14.7 billion-dollar budget, for itself. That makes it the biggest component of the intelligence community. For a long time a lot of folks had thought maybe the CIA was no longer the dominant player in U.S. intelligence, maybe it was the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency which flies satellites. Maybe the NSA was spending more money. But in fact we now know $14.7 billion going to the CIA every year.
Eamon Javers
CNBC Reporter
KQED 08/31/2013
Gharib: in terms of the budget numbers, how does it compare to what the US spent on intelligence a couple years ago? Javers: "The Washington Post" calculated this as best they could. It's very difficult to do because we don't really have historical information, either, just as we didn't have this information in the present day. But their best guess is this makes U.S. spending on intelligence now higher than it was even at the height of the cold war by, you know, $10 billion or so in current dollars. Gharib: Really adds up when you put iit all together.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
KQED 09/19/2014
Javers: We had the Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper here today speaking before a crowd. He said that this represents one of the big threats to the U.S. intelligence community. Take a listen. Clapper: The strategic environment also includes the recent factors that affect intelligence community capabilities. What I have referred to on the hill as the perfect storm that’s dogging and degrading our capabilities, the theft and leak of NSA and IC documents and loss of collection as a result. The resulting damage relationships with foreign and corporate partners. Javers: Now, when Clapper talks about corporate partners there he’s not talking specifically about Apple because this speech was presumably written before the Apple news. But he is talking about a about a concern that intelligence agencies have that they’re gong to get a lack of cooperation across the board going forward.
Eamon Javers
CNBC Washington Reporter
KQED 09/19/2014
Mathisen: So Eamon, is this really the caption on this, how Edward Snowden changed American business? Javers: Yeah, absolutely, the Snowden disclosures as you saw Clapper say right there really led a lot of American companies to reevaluate what their cooperation is here with intelligence and whether it’s good for their bottom lines or not. And it raises sort of an existential question about what companies' responsibilities are here to law enforcement and to intelligence and to the United States versus to their customers. Gharib: What is corporate America's obligation to the country and to their customers? Javers: You know, there is a legal answer to that question, which is that they have to follow the letter of the law and if they get a warrant and have the ability to turn over the information they have to do that. And then there is sort of a moral and political and ideological answer to that question that I'm not qualified to give you. But every company is wrestling with this in a lot of spheres.
Eamon Javers
CNBC Washington Reporter
KQED 09/19/2014
Javers: Well, the big change here is that Apple is no longer going to keep your password on hand, so the encryption on the system will be impossible for Apple to break even if it wanted to. So that means that if law enforcement goes to Apple or intelligence agencies go to Apple with a request for information on a particular target of their surveillance, Apple will be unable to comply with that request. That’s the kind of thing that’s got intelligence agencies here in Washington very nervous about U.S. tech companies sort of moving away and cooperating less frequently with the government.
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